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Posted by on Mar 8, 2015 in Compute, Infrastructure | 1 comment

vSphere 6 Upgrade Install Error NSX

vSphere6_NSX_Error

 

<CONFLICTING_VIBS ERROR: Vibs on the host are conflicting with vibs in metadata.  Remove the conflicting vibs or use Image Builder to create a customer ISO providing newer versions of the conflicting vibs.  [‘VMware_bootbank_esx-dvfiler-switch-security_5.5.0-0-0.2107100’, ‘VMware_bootbank_esx-vsip_5.5.0-0-0.2107100’, ‘VMware_bootbank_esx-vxlan_5.5.0-0-0.2107100’]>

I spent the day upgrading all my hosts to vSphere 6.0 from vSphere 5.5.  It felt right, it felt like it was time.  However, I must admit – I was not successful at first.  Did you check out the way wordy above? Yikes!

What I could make out from the upgrade error is there was something about the vSphere 6 upgrade that wasn’t jiving with NSX 6.1.2.  It appeared if I could “un-prep” this host then I could be on my way.  Fortunately, it is way easy to remove the VIBs that NSX installs during a host prep.

Once your host is back online, SSH to it and issue the following commands in bold:
~ # esxcli software vib remove -n esx-vxlan

Removal Result
Message: The update completed successfully, but the system needs to be rebooted for the changes to be effective.
Reboot Required: true
VIBs Installed:
VIBs Removed: VMware_bootbank_esx-vxlan_5.5.0-0.0.2107100
VIBs Skipped:
~ #
~ # esxcli software vib remove -n esx-dvfilter-switch-security
Removal Result
Message: The update completed successfully, but the system needs to be rebooted for the changes to be effective.
Reboot Required: true
VIBs Installed:
VIBs Removed: VMware_bootbank_esx-dvfilter-switch-security_5.5.0-0.0.2107100
VIBs Skipped:
~ # esxcli software vib remove -n esx-vsip
Removal Result
Message: The update completed successfully, but the system needs to be rebooted for the changes to be effective.
Reboot Required: true
VIBs Installed:
VIBs Removed: VMware_bootbank_esx-vsip_5.5.0-0.0.2107100
VIBs Skipped:

That’s it! Go ahead and start that the upgrade again!

PS I’m sure VMware will have better method of upgrading to vSphere 6 where NSX is installed.  However, us early adopters sometimes don’t get to ride on easy street.

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Posted by on Oct 4, 2014 in Automation, Compute, Infrastructure | 0 comments

DPM – A vSphere Feature That Can Save Your Home Lab From Thermonuclear Meltdown

Screen shot 2011-08-03 at 1.09.18 PM

 

Florida summers are hot.  Especially when you work out of a small home office and have a ton of equipment running non-stop.  This year I finally had enough and was motivated to do something about it. My home lab consists of two Dell PowerEdge C6100 rack mount servers running two nodes each and a Synology DS1813+ NAS as well as all of your typical networking gear all tucked away in a tiny little closet.

I started playing around with a lesser used feature in vSphere called ‘Dynamic Power Management’ or DPM.  DPM works with DRS to monitor the workloads across hosts, consolidate them down to run on as few hosts as possible and then put the vacant hosts in standby mode thereby saving power.  When the workloads spike, DPM reverses the process, turns on hosts and DRS redistributes the loads amongst the hosts.  It truly is as simple as that.

DPM is a simple cluster setting.  Open up your vCenter web or C+ client, right click the cluster and select ‘edit settings’.  Highlight vSphere DRS and choose ‘Automatic’ from the Power Management drop down.

DPM

 

After turning this on and waiting around a few minutes…nothing happened.  So I set the DPM Threshold to the most aggressive setting in the C+ client to try to get it to react.

DPM Threshold

After waiting a few minutes with no vMotion activity or hosts beginning to go into standby mode, I started to research custom settings.  I found the following that I applied under the ‘Advanced Options’ button at the bottom of the DRS configuration screen.

Advanced Options DRS

And voila!  A few seconds after I hit okay, vMotion started consolidating VMs and eventually put three of four hosts in standby (I don’t run HA in my lab as none of my environment is mission-critical).  Now, depending on the workloads, I can usually get a 10:1 consolidation ratio which is about what I need to be running in my day-to-day activities to remain productive.  As soon as I launch more VMs, within a few seconds I see another host come out of standby mode and DRS load balances my environment as expected.

My office is A LOT cooler now and my power bill saw a noticeable drop thanks to DPM.

Meltdown averted!!!

images

 

 

Disclaimer

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